why has the western public service no examples of smart bot knowhow hotlines empowering community self-sufficiency? - new york's 15th annual graduate collaboration cafe focused on this problem march 22 and has found leading solution out of hong kong and various asian chapters of the UN metaverse - do you need to know about this? chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk writes - whilst I have lived near Bethesda Natronal Health Palace for 25 years my favorite community visit is where Thurgood grew up in Baltimore- if you have time to tour why , let's just do it. Hopkins & Armor can be included in visit if you like.
To our inspirational black american TGM - who's yours?SUMMARY DO CHILDREN HAVE A FUTURE: Back in 1951 my family and friends were given the most curious gift of all - dad was briefed by Princeton's Father of Intelligent Machines. Von Neumann. that journalists and teachers should practice asking big decision makers what will you gov with 100 times more tech per decade? or million times "moore" per 30 year inter-generation? Q&A explains last chance deadlines for Uniting Peoples or Nations or any other game/ people play on earth
BEEINGs.app & AbedPlay 50 million teachers asks for help - imagine designing 2025 LIBRARY - section 1 moral stories of people without engines from 1750s Glasgow to 90% of Bangladesh's 20th Century; 2 collaboration stories where love of each others children safely blended 2 crises posed by machines the energy inputs humans and machines each need; the intel that humans and machines can blend if we are to continue as nature's smartest specie, .what do you feel needs to be in section 3 - perhaps some arts and verses and music every community can celebrate as girls and boys come out to play?;

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

 today's bloomberg opinion had lot of interesting stories - they also show how finance connects with everything; unfortunately there is a contradiction between where american financiers and politicians are driving 4% of humans locked into usa and sustainability of 96% of other humans- a paradox arises when you are the worlds reserve currency - it is no longer possible for monetary policy to sustain your own peoples as you are being played by the worlds global organisations and whither the purposes of their market sectors are exponentially sustainable


FOLLOW US   GET THE NEWSLETTER

This is Bloomberg Opinion Today, a credit report of Bloomberg Opinion’s opinions. Sign up here.

Today’s Agenda

America’s Downgrade Non-Crisis Turns 10

Where were you on August 5, 2011? 

No idea? Here’s a hint: It was a day something historic and unthinkable happened. Those usually burn into your memory, right? Like the JFK assassination or the 9/11 attacks. 

But you could be forgiven for having no recollection of August 5, 2011, which was the day Standard & Poor’s downgraded its credit rating for the United States of America. It was indeed historic and shocking. But it was almost immediately forgettable, because it was so meaningless. Other rating agencies ignored it, and America has had no trouble getting loans in the decade since. 

Nevertheless, John Chambers, the former S&P analyst responsible for the downgrade, recently told Brian Chappatta that he has no regrets. The political dysfunction that inspired the downgrade (remember the ridiculous debt-ceiling fight?) has only gotten worse, he says. Even the $2 trillion mistake by the rating agency in forecasting the country’s future debt burden has been rendered moot by the wild spending and tax-cutting we’ve seen in recent years. S&P has had plenty of chances to upgrade the U.S. from AA+ but has repeatedly declined, as recently as this week.

Of course, credit ratings only have meaning if society agrees they have meaning, like money or Libor or Christopher Nolan films. The financial crisis taught us hard lessons about giving ratings too much power. And again, the U.S. still has no trouble borrowing, despite all the dysfunction and spending and whatnot. But Democrats must think Chambers is at least partly onto something, given they plan to raise taxes to help pay for their next big spending package. Read the whole thing

Further Political-Dysfunction Reading: A " talking filibuster" won't solve the Senate’s filibuster problem because the GOP is perfectly willing to spend as much time as it takes reading Green Eggs and Ham or whatever. — Jonathan Bernstein 

Paid Post

The power of PayPal online, now in person.

PayPal gives your business a way to accept touch-free, in-person payments. Generate your QR code from the app, then display it on your device or print it out. No new equipment required. Download the app.

Customer must have PayPal account and app to pay.

PayPal

The Next Elon Musk Spricht Deutsch

Volkswagen today became Germany’s most valuable company, which is a little like becoming the best baseball player in AAA. Its $166 billion market cap would put it maybe in the top 50 of U.S. public companies, and mathematics informs us that’s just a fraction of Tesla’s $650 billion. Still, you’ve gotta start somewhere, and VW is on the rise because it's looking more and more like a true rival to Tesla, writes Chris Bryant. They also have a longer track record of producing vehicles. Now it’s focusing on software and batteries with a view toward electrifying half its new cars by 2030. On the downside, VW also has an old-line automaker’s high costs, including gazillions of employees. But VW might also have an easier time scaling up than Tesla has, making Herbert Diess a real threat to take Elon Musk’s Technoking crown. 

Building a Biden Doctrine

It’s early days yet, but President Joe Biden isn’t exactly reviving every aspect of his old boss’s foreign policy. That may be a good thing. For example, Eli Lake notes, Secretary of State Antony Blinken, ahead of a meeting with Chinese officials in Alaska tomorrow, has used some surprisingly tough language about Beijing’s aggression and treatment of Uyghurs. This might help reassure regional allies that Biden won’t be as forgiving as Barack Obama or as unfocused as Donald Trump about China’s threat. 

Less encouraging, so far at least, has been Biden’s attitude toward Syria, writes Bobby Ghosh. Obama infamously drew a “red line” there and let Bashar al-Assad cross it. Trump didn’t make such a glaring mistake but was still too passive. Biden’s actions so far promise more of the same. Syria is too important for such neglect, Bobby writes, requiring more aggression — including, God forbid, the enforcement of red lines.

Bonus Foreign-Policy Reading: Boris Johnson’s “Global Britain” vision is ambitious, but expensive. — Therese Raphael 

Telltale Charts

As Jay Powell suggested today, dismissing market agita about the threat of higher prices, inflation isn’t even close to becoming a problem. Nir Kaissar points out the nightmarish stagflation of the 1970s built up very slowly and with plenty of warning. Policy makers won’t let that happen again.

Further Reading

The CDC’s six-foot-distance rule keeps kids out of schools despite studies showing a three-foot distance is just as safe. — Bloomberg’s editorial board 

Facebook must confront its vaccine-skeptic problem. — Tim O’Brien 

Fighting the Purdue bankruptcy deal because it strips too little from the Sacklers risks keeping money from victims. — Joe Nocera 

A new study shows Keynes was right about real estate being riskier than it seems. — John Authers 

We’ve been mistakenly blaming margin debt for market crashes since the ‘20s. — Stephen Mihm 

Racial bias in NFL concussion tests deprives Black players of settlement money. — Cathy O’Neil 

The NFT craze is no different from other parts of the art market. — Tyler Cowen 

ICYMI

The IRS is delaying the tax-filing deadline.

Trump’s net worth has taken a hit.

An ARKK copycat is trouncing Cathie Wood’s ETF.

Kickers

10,000-year-old basket found in Israel. (h/t Ellen Kominers)

App creates fake noise to help you escape Zoom meetings. (h/t Mike Smedley)

Dogs may be 95% accurate at sniffing out Covid.

The human brain developed because larger animals went extinct.

Notes: Please send fake noises and complaints to Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.net.

Sign up here and follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

No comments:

Post a Comment