from 2008 I was privileged to accompany muhammad yunus on USA tours from Tuskegee to Oregon from Atlanta to Greensborough ND; from UDC to UNH - we interviewed over 100 leaders of historically black universities helped judge a thousand student entrepreneur pitches- but at the end of it all I found a community in Baltimore where Thurgood Marshall grew up- their massive open collaboration (social action learning) could be turned into a test for licence for english-language teaching let alone public sector journalism or reality tv apprenticeships! imo -why has western public service got almost no examples of smart bot knowhow hotlines empowering community self-sufficiency? - new york's 15th annual graduate collaboration cafe focused on this problem march 22 and has found leading solution out of hong kong and various asian chapters of the UN metaverse - do you need to know about this? (see eg Beeings.app chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk writes - whilst I have lived near Bethesda Natronal Health Palace for 25 years my favorite community visit is where Thurgood grew up in Baltimore- if you have time to tour why , let's just do it. Hopkins & Armor can be included in visit if you like.
To our inspirational black american TGM - who's yours?SUMMARY DO CHILDREN HAVE A FUTURE: Back in 1951 my family and friends were given the most curious gift of all - dad was briefed by Princeton's Father of Intelligent Machines. Von Neumann. that journalists and teachers should practice asking big decision makers what will you gov with 100 times more tech per decade? or million times "moore" per 30 year inter-generation? Q&A explains last chance deadlines for Uniting Peoples or Nations or any other game/ people play on earth
BEEINGs.app & AbedPlay 50 million teachers asks for help - imagine designing 2025 LIBRARY - section 1 moral stories of people without engines from 1750s Glasgow to 90% of Bangladesh's 20th Century; 2 collaboration stories where love of each others children safely blended 2 crises posed by machines the energy inputs humans and machines each need; the intel that humans and machines can blend if we are to continue as nature's smartest specie, .what do you feel needs to be in section 3 - perhaps some arts and verses and music every community can celebrate as girls and boys come out to play?;

Thursday, April 14, 2022

Un report how much of finance is destroying sustainability of generations

https://www.un.org/development/desa/financing/post-news/financing-sustainable-development-report-2022  Guterres As we release this report on financing for sustainable development, the world is under enormous and

growing stress. And we, the international community, are failing to respond adequately. The COVID-19

pandemic is still raging, now in its third year. The climate crisis continues unabated and largely

unaddressed, pollution and biodiversity loss continue to threaten the health of the planet, and multiple

geopolitical conflicts are devastating untold lives.

The war in Ukraine is the latest in a cascade of crises for developing countries that continue to struggle to make

development progress, achieve vaccine equity and achieve a just and safe recovery. The cost of energy, food and

other commodities is rising, further intensifying volatility in global financial markets. There is a great danger that,

as our collective attention shifts to the conflict, we neglect other crises that will not go away.

It would be a tragedy if donors increased their military expenditure at the expense of Official Development Assistance and climate

action. It would also be self-defeating. Without more international support and a strengthened multilateralism, the world will diverge

further, inequality will soar, and prospects for an inclusive and prosperous future will be further undermined.

We must not lose sight of the commitment of the 2030 Agenda to leave no one behind, especially at this perilous moment. Developed

countries have been able to finance a rapid economic recovery from the pandemic, through massive fiscal support and aggressive

monetary policy responses. But most developing countries can afford neither, despite international support. Instead, they continue to

face increasingly high costs of lending and have had to cut their education and health budgets and other SDG investments, undermining

not only their recovery, but also their medium and long-term development prospects.

Finance is both a contributor to the divergence we are seeing between developed and developing countries and a key to overcoming

it. In my report, Our Common Agenda, I have identified key deficiencies in our global financial system that exacerbate inequalities and

drive risk. This year’s report on financing for sustainable development spells out actions designed to overcome the current paralysis of

international policy-making and build a better multilateralism that can address the multiple crises we face.

We must close the financing gaps that prevent so many countries from investing in recovery, climate action and the SDGs. Developed

countries must meet their ODA commitments, particularly to Least Developed Countries. We must take full advantage of our public

development banks to scale up long-term financing. And we must immediately and fully finance the Access to COVID-19 Tools

Accelerator so that vaccines can reach 70 per cent of the world’s population during the first half of 2022.

To build a more sustainable, inclusive and resilient global economy that works for all, we must also reform the international financial

architecture with rules that are inclusive, effective and fair. Our inability to address debt challenges in many countries speaks to the

glaring inequities that continue to characterize our global economic order.

As well as addressing the weaknesses of the Common Framework for Debt Treatment, we must urgently work toward a more

comprehensive solution to sovereign debt challenges. The United Nations can provide a neutral and inclusive venue to bring together

all countries, major creditors, debtors and other relevant stakeholders to discuss how to reform the international debt architecture. This

report provides the basis for such discussions.

It is time to abandon short-term profit maximization for the few and move towards a long-term outlook that integrates economic, social

and environmental justice and opportunity for all. To that end, we must align all financing policies with SDG and climate priorities—

government budgets, tax systems, investments, regulatory frameworks and corporate reporting requirements. And we must change

how we measure, and ultimately think of progress. In a world of interlinked and systemic risk, GDP is no longer an appropriate metric

of how we measure wealth and shared prosperity. We must find ways to take vulnerabilities into account more systematically in the

allocation of concessional financing and actions on debt.

I commend this report’s recommendations on how to close financing gaps and create a better international financing architecture. It is

time to change course.


previously 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmE226XidUg

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